Threat Actors are Using YouTube to Lure Users into their Trap – E Hacking News


 

Fortinet security researcher ‘accidentally discovered a unique way of tricking YouTube users. Due to Covid-19, as well as the recent surge in the value of the stock market and cryptocurrencies, more people than ever are at home looking for livestock market/crypto-related content on streaming platforms like YouTube, etc. This might be to compensate for the lack of in-person interactions that we would normally have in a non-Covid-19 world, as well as to perhaps make some quick income on the side. During a random midnight search for similar content, the researcher accidentally stumbled upon a LIVE Bitcoin scam on YouTube (yes, this time it was on YouTube and not on Twitter). 

YouTube has various labels/buttons on its home page to identify trending categories of videos, and this one indicated that several scams were streaming “live”. The first video researcher saw after clicking the Live button was titled, “Chamath Palihapitiya – What will be the New World of Finance? | SPACs, Coinbase IPO and NFT” with the URL link “hxxps://www[.]youtube[.]com/watch=cFstoyKl99s”. 

The next thing the researcher noticed was the video’s caption message, “Our mission is to advance humanity by solving the world’s hardest problems. We want to thank our supporters and also help crypto mass adoption, so 1000 BTC will be distributed among everyone who takes part in the event. You can find all the information on the website.” And also, unlike most content creators, the website link “More info: cham-event[.]com” did not include any video descriptions.

Another red flag was that while this YouTube channel had 252k subscribers, there was only ONE video on the channel. This could either be a case of a hacked YouTube channel that had all previous videos deleted, OR it could be that the malicious attacker somehow found a way to add fake subscribers to his/her channel. 

Earlier this month, hackers associated with these scams escalated their activity when they compromised two YouTube channels that maintain over eight million subscribers. In this particular case, the hackers modified these channels to impersonate our brand, using the Gemini name and logo. In light of these ongoing events, we want to share how these attacks work, discuss Gemini’s ongoing actions to protect our customers and provide some tips for YouTube channel owners to better secure. 



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